Trees Are Key To Fighting Urban Heat — But Cities Keep Losing Them

Annie Haigler steps out of her home in Louisville, Ky., pulling a handkerchief out of her pocket to dab sweat off her forehead. She enjoys sitting on her porch, especially to watch the sunrise. She has always been a morning person.

The tree cover in her neighborhood, Park DuValle, is about half the city average. As one of the lower-income areas of Louisville, it’s in line with a citywide trend: Wealthier areas of the city have up to twice as many trees as do poorer areas.

“If we show you a map of tree canopy in virtually any city in America, we’re also showing you a map of income,” says Jad Daley, president and CEO of the nonprofit American Forests. “And in many cases we’re showing you a map of race and ethnicity.”

Louisville is losing 54,000 trees each year from development, natural disasters, disease, invasive species and lack of tree care. And it’s not alone. From 2009 to 2014, 44 states lost tree cover in urban areas — that’s around 28.5 million trees lost every year, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

Article URL : https://www.npr.org/2019/09/04/755349748/trees-are-key-to-fighting-urban-heat-but-cities-keep-losing-them

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