Another look at Genesis 1:1

Another look at Genesis 1:1

Genesis 1:1 is the original creation of the universe “in the beginning God created the heaven and the earth” most translations use “heavens” but they both mean the same basically anything you can see in a telescope. We don’t know from Scripture exactly how long ago this was. Based on science it was around 15 billion years ago for the universe and 4.5 billion years ago for the earth. It’s important to note here that time is irrelevant to God because he exists outside of our concept of time. And it appears that he set certain natural principles in motion and probably tweaks those a few times until life appeared on this earth.
Genesis 1:2 talks about an earth that was without “form and void”. Many have thought this is how God created the earth at first but this interpretation cannot be correct if we look at Isaiah 45:18 with the exact same Hebrew for “form and void” is interpreted “vain” or as the rest of the verse implies he didn’t create it “uninhabitable”. In the King James it says the world “was” hayah without form and void but the Hebrew word for “was” is more commonly translated “to be or to become”. So it appears that there was some kind of catastrophic event that led to a global flood. Because this is not the way God originally created the earth. In fact the Hebrew word for “earth” implies dry land.
The keyword is the Hebrew word “hayah” which is primarily translated to become or the sense of coming to pass in most of its uses, yet the translators use the word “was”.
Here is a link to the interlinear Bible for the first two verses in Genesis:
http://biblehub.com/interlinear/genesis/1-1.htm
http://biblehub.com/interlinear/genesis/1-2.htm
Some of the Hebrew words from Genesis:
(erets – Earth ) (hayah – was, come to pass, became) (tohuw – formlessness, confusion, chaos) (bohuw – emptiness, void, waste) (choshek – darkness, obscurity ) (paniym – face, surface) (tehowm – primeval ocean, deep) (ruwach – wind, breath, mind, spirit ) (Elohiym – God) (rachaph – move, hover) (al – over) (paniym – face, surface) (mayim – waters, waterflood).
One of the fundamental principles of interpreting Scripture is to compare Scripture to other Scriptures. This is particularly helpful due to the fact that most of us don’t speak Greek or Hebrew which are very dynamic languages that have their challenges when you try to translate to English. So it’s nice to have a digital Bible that includes Strong’s concordance of Greek and Hebrew words as well as multiple translations.
With this in mind, we can better understand the six days of Genesis where God establishes order out of chaos from the global flood of Genesis 1:2. With this in mind, this eliminates most of the confusion about “light and darkness” and when the sun was created, around 4.5 billion years before the six-day event. This is also why the fossil record indicates life before the reestablishment of it during the six-day event. Exactly how long it took to go from Genesis 1:2 to Genesis 1:3 is difficult to say again that could be a long period of time. Because between Genesis 1:1 and 1:3 you probably have close to 15 billion years, again time is irrelevant to God.
There are some things concerning the six-day event that aren’t completely clear for instance the dividing of light and darkness and the complete restoration of the lights from Earth’s perspective on the fourth day. There appeared to be some light barrier which I assume are very thick clouds from a catastrophic event in Genesis 1:2 that block the sun, moon and stars from being observable from Earth. When on day four God said, “let there be lights in heaven” was like drawing back the curtain so what was there could be plainly seen. Because if you notice each day ended with morning and evening. This is the relationship of the earth rotation in relationship to the sun from a given point on earth. So earth rotation in relationship to the sun was in effect for the past 4.5 billion years give or take 6000 years.
It’s important that you notice a couple of words like “created” and “made” or “let there be” these words have different meanings. When we talk about created we’re talking about bringing something that didn’t exist before into being (something out of nothing). When we’re talking about made or let there be were talking about things that used to be that are being restored or we’re talking about things that we can’t see becoming visible. What I find interesting is when it comes to the creation of man both of these words are being used. It’s as if God is restoring something that was here before him but giving it an upgrade by giving it a feature it never had before. Is it possible there were humanoids before Genesis 1:2 that both did not have our intellect and/or have our spiritual component?
Genesis chapter 2 is a commentary on the six-day event. It’s not designed to just be a repeat of the six-day event in Genesis 1.

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